iPad Pro OLED Panels Rumored To Start Production In 2024

According to the Korea Herald, Apple is expected to begin production of OLED displays for its next-gen iPad Pro in February 2024. MacRumors reports: Sources familiar with the matter speaking to the Korea Herald claim that LG Display is set to initiate OLED production for the new iPad Pro as early as February next year at their facility in Paju, Gyeonggi Province -- a time frame around three months sooner than previously expected. The displays are expected to be three times the price of those used in iPhones, which could translate to higher prices for customers. [...] Apple is reportedly seeking around 10 million OLED panels for the iPad in 2024. LG is expected to supply around 60% of the OLED panels, with the remaining portion supplied by Samsung, which is expected to focus on the 11-inch model only. Production of the panels for the next-generation iPad Pro is expected to help LG Displays' financial recovery next year. LG and Samsung are said to be currently finalizing price negotiations with Apple.

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Zelle Begins Refunds For Imposter Scams After Government Pressure

According to Reuters, banks on the payment app Zelle have begun refunding victims of imposter scams to address consumer protection concerns raised by U.S. lawmakers and the federal consumer watchdog. From the report: The 2,100 financial firms on Zelle, a peer-to-peer network owned by seven banks including JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America, began reversing transfers as of June 30 for customers duped into sending money to scammers claiming to be from a government agency, bank or existing service provider, said Early Warning Services (EWS), the banks' company that owns Zelle. That's "well above existing legal and regulatory requirements," Ben Chance, chief fraud risk officer at EWS, told Reuters. Federal rules require banks to reimburse customers for payments made without their authorization, such as by hackers, but not when customers themselves make the transfer. While Zelle disclosed Aug. 30 that it had introduced a new reimbursement benefit for "specific scam types," it has not previously provided details on its new imposter scam refund policy due to worries doing so might encourage criminals to make false scam claims, a spokesperson said. The new policy marks a major shift from last year when bankers, including JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon, told lawmakers worried about rising scams that it was unreasonable to require banks to refund transfers that customers were tricked into approving.

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Healthcare Giant McLaren Reveals Data On 2.2 Million Patients Stolen During Ransomware Attack

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Michigan-based McLaren Health Care has confirmed that the sensitive personal and health information of 2.2 million patients was compromised during a cyberattack earlier this year. A ransomware gang later took credit for the cyberattack. In a new data breach notice filed with Maine's attorney general, McLaren said hackers were in its systems for three weeks during July 28 through August 23 before the healthcare company noticed a week later on August 31. McLaren said the hackers accessed patient names, their date of birth and Social Security number, and a wealth of medical information, including billing, claims and diagnosis information, prescription and medication details, and information relating to diagnostic results and treatments. Medicare and Medicaid patient information was also taken. McLaren is a healthcare provider with 13 hospitals across Michigan and about 28,000 total employees. McLaren, whose website touts its cost efficiency measures, made over $6 billion in revenue in 2022. News of the incident broke in October when the Alphv ransomware gang (also known as BlackCat) claimed responsibility for the cyberattack, claiming it took millions of patients' personal information. Days after the cyberattack was disclosed, Michigan attorney general Dana Nessel warned state residents that the breach "could affect large numbers of patients." TechCrunch has seen several screenshots posted by the ransomware gang on its dark web leak site showing access to the company's password manager, internal financial statements, some employee information, and spreadsheets of patient-related personal and health information, including names, addresses, phone numbers, Social Security numbers, and diagnostic information. Alphv/BlackCat claimed in its post that the gang had been in contact with a McLaren representative, without providing evidence of the claim.

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