‘I Landed a (Model) Rocket Like SpaceX. It Took 7 Years’

"If you've been following Joe Barnard's rocketry projects for the past few years, you'll know that one of his primary goals has been to propulsively land a model rocket like SpaceX," reports Hackaday. "Now, 7 years into the rollercoaster journey, he has finally achieved that goal with the latest version of his Scout rocket." Many things need to come together to launch AND land a rocket on standard hobby-grade solid fuel rocket motors. A core component is stabilization of the rocket during the entire flight, which achieved using a thrust-vectoring control (TVC) mount for the rocket motors and a custom flight computer loaded with carefully tuned guidance software. Until recently, the TVC mounts were 3D printed, but Joe upgraded it to machined aluminum to eliminate as much flex and play as possible. Since solid-fuel rockets can't technically be throttled, [Joe] originally tried to time the ignition time of the descent motor in such a manner that it would burn out as the rocket touches down. The ignition time and exact thrust numbers simply weren't repeatable enough, so in his 2020 landing attempts, he achieved some throttling effect by oscillating the TVC side to side, reducing the vertical thrust component. This eventually gave way to the final solution, a pair of ceramic pincers which block the thrust of the motors as required. "I have been trying to do what you just saw for seven years," Barnard says in the video, remembering that he started the project back in the fall of 2015. "Not because it's revolutionary or game-changing for model rocketry, but because it's a really cool project, and I knew I would learn a lot." (On Twitter, Barnard added that "I had no background in aero, electrical engineering, coding, etc so it took a lot of trial and error.") And in the video Barnard made sure to thank his 690 supporters on Patreon — and also shared a surprise. He'd printed out a sheet of paper with the name of every one of his Patreon supporters, rolled it up, and inserted it into the hollow center of his rocket before the flight. "So if you support, you were part of this." The Patreon account offers more details on Barnard's mission. "Learning by experimentation is the most effective way to gain a deep understanding of new concepts, which is why providing hands-on experience with advanced rocketry components is important for the next generation of scientists, engineers, and astronauts." And the video ends with Bernard describing the next projects he'll attempt: More SpaceX-like vertical landings A 9-foot model of SpaceX's Starship Super Heavy rocket A special secret project known only as "the meat rocket" An actual model-rocket space shot — that is, a rocket that ascends over 100 kilometers

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Class Action Alleges Experian Didn’t Stop Identity Thieves from Hijacking Accounts

"A class action lawsuit has been filed against big-three consumer credit bureau Experian," reports Krebs on Security, "over reports that the company did little to prevent identity thieves from hijacking consumer accounts. The legal filing cites liberally from an investigation KrebsOnSecurity published in July, which found that identity thieves were able to assume control over existing Experian accounts simply by signing up for new accounts using the victim's personal information and a different email address. The lawsuit, filed July 28, 2022 in California Central District Court, argues that Experian's documented practice of allowing the re-registration of accounts without first verifying that the existing account authorized the changes is a violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The lawsuit even cites a July blog post from Krebs on Security. The blog post's title? "Experian, You Have Some Explaining to Do." After providing my Social Security Number (SSN), date of birth, and answering several multiple choice questions whose answers are derived almost entirely from public records, Experian promptly changed the email address associated with my credit file. It did so without first confirming that new email address could respond to messages, or that the previous email address approved the change... After that, Experian prompted me to select new secret questions and answers, as well as a new account PIN — effectively erasing the account's previously chosen PIN and recovery questions. Once I'd changed the PIN and security questions, Experian's site helpfully reminded me that I have a security freeze on file, and would I like to remove or temporarily lift the security freeze? Experian did send an automated message to the account's original email address when a new one was added, Krebs wrote, but wondered what good that would actually do. "The only recourse Experian offered in the alert was to sign in, or send an email to an Experian inbox that replies with the message, 'this email address is no longer monitored'..." "I could see no option in my account to enable multi-factor authentication for all logins..." And Krebs added Friday that "Since that story ran I've heard from several more readers who were doing everything right and still had their Experian accounts hijacked, with little left to show for it except an email alert from Experian saying they had changed the address on file for the account."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.